CEMENT STABILIZATION ON ROAD BASES

CEMENT STABILIZATION ON ROAD BASES


What is Soil Stabilization?
Soil is one of nature’s most abundant construction materials. Almost all construction is built with or upon soil. When unsuitable construction conditions are encountered, a contractor has four options;
  1. Find a new construction site
  2. Redesign the structure so it can be constructed on the poor soil.
  3. Remove the poor soil and replace it with good soil.
  4. Improve the engineering properties of the site soils.
In general option 1 and 2 tends to be impracticable today. While in the past, option 3 has been mostly commonly used method. However, due to improvement in technology coupled with increased transportation costs, option 4 is being used more often today and is expected to dramatically increase in the future.
Improving an on-site (in situ) soil’s engineering properties is referred to as either “soil modification” or “soil stabilization.”  The term “modification” implies a minor change in the properties of a soil, while stabilization means that the engineering properties of the soil have been changed enough to allow field construction to take place.
Factors Affecting Soil Cement Stabilization
During soil cement stabilization the following factors are affecting.
  1. Type of soil: Cement stabilization may be applied in fine or granular soil, however granular is preferable for cement stabilization.
  2. Quantity of cement: A large amount of cement is needed for cement stabilization.
  3. Quantity of water: Adequate water is needed for the stabilization.
  4. Mixing, compaction and curing: Adequate mixing, compaction and curing is needed for cement stabilization.
  5. Admixtures: Cement has some important admixtures itself which helps them to create a proper bond. These admixtures pay a vital role in case of reaction between cement and water.
Advantages of Cement Stabilization
  1. It is widely available.
  2. Cost is relatively low.
  3. It is highly durable.
  4. Soil cement is quite weather resistant and strong.
  5. Granular soils with sufficient fines are ideally suited for cement stabilization as it requires least amount of cement.
  6. Soil cement reduces the swelling characteristics of the soil.
  7. It is commonly used for stabilizing sandy and other low plasticity soils. Cement interacts with the silt and clay fractions and reduces their affinity for water.
Disadvantages of Cement Stabilization
  1. Cracks may form in soil cement.
  2. It is harmful for environment.
  3. It requires extra labor.
  4. The quantity of water must be sufficient for hydration of cement and making the mixture workable.
This video has nicely demonstrated about the detailed calculation step by step

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