Cam and Follower Mechanism in Engine - Theory of Machines

Cam and Follower Mechanism in Engine - Theory of Machines

Cam and Follower Mechanism in Engine - Theory of Machines
Cam and Follower Mechanism in Engine - Theory of Machines


A cam is a rotating or sliding piece in a mechanical linkage used especially in transforming rotary motion into linear motion. It is often a part of a rotating wheel (e.g. an eccentric wheel) or shaft (e.g. a cylinder with an irregular shape) that strikes a lever at one or more points on its circular path.

The cam can be a simple tooth, as is used to deliver pulses of power to a steam hammer, for example, or an eccentric disc or other shape that produces a smooth reciprocating (back and forth) motion in the follower, which is a lever making contact with the cam.

A cam timer is similar, and were widely used for electric machine control (an electromechanical timer in a washing machine being a common example) before the advent of inexpensive electronics, microcontrollers, integrated circuits, programmable logic controllers and digital control.

A cam and follower mechanism is a profiled shape mounted on a shaft that causes a lever or follower to move. Cams are used to convert rotary to linear (reciprocating) motion. As the cam rotates, the follower rises and falls in a process known as reciprocating motion.



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